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How to relieve breast pain while breastfeeding via lactationlink.com

How to relieve breast pain while breastfeeding

By | Breastfeeding, Breastfeeding support, breastfeeding tips, Home/Hospital Visits

Hi mamas, I’m Stephanie Weight Hadfield, an International Board Certified Lactation Consultant (IBCLC) and mom of 4. I’m here to talk about common causes and solutions for breast pain in breastfeeding mothers. 

We are often asked about various kinds of breast pain so today I am sharing some information and resources for how to deal with common types of breast pain. Note: this article is discussing breast pain. If you’re concerned about nipple pain, you can read more about that here.

relieve breast pain

Common causes & solutions for breast pain in breastfeeding mothers

Engorgement. Your breasts may feel very full and firm in the first couple of weeks of breastfeeding, while your body is enthusiastically gearing up to churn out plenty of milk for your baby. Breast pain related to engorgement is felt in both breasts, during and/or between feedings. This pain will go away as your breasts settle into their milk-making role and engorgement resolves, usually by the time your baby is about 2 weeks old.

How to relieve breast pain while breastfeeding via lactationlink.com

{Lil’ Buds breast comfort packs: use code LLINK for 10% off}

For relief from engorgement, first make sure that your baby is latching deeply and nursing frequently, at least 8-12 (for a newborn) or more times a day. You can hand express a small amount of milk before feeding to help soften the areola and make it easier for baby to latch well. You can also hand express just enough milk between feeds to relieve uncomfortable pressure. Cold compresses on your breasts between feedings can help reduce swelling and pain. Read more about relief from engorgement here.

Strong Milk Letdown. If your breast pain happens in both breasts and starts at the beginning of a feed when your baby starts gulping, it could be due to a strong milk letdown. Ultrasound studies have shown that this is due to the stretching of the milk ducts as the milk is released. The wider the milk ducts opened, the more discomfort mothers reported. This pain doesn’t typically last through the whole feed and usually decreases and disappears on its own over the first month or so of breastfeeding. Relaxation or distraction techniques can help you get through it. Many mothers find slow deep breaths or counting to be helpful, and babies seem to handle the strong flow of milk better in a side-lying or laid-back position.

How to relieve breast pain while breastfeeding via lactationlink.com

Referred pain. Breast pain can a problem when neck, back and shoulder muscles are strained by leaning forward in an uncomfortable position to nurse. This referred pain can happen because the breasts and the muscle strain share the same nerve pathways. Gentle stretching of the shoulders and back to relax tight muscles can provide immediate relief in these cases. Many moms find it helpful to place their hands on either side of an open doorway and leaning forward. Nursing in a laid-back position can reduce the strain on your body, and help you be more comfortable.

How to relieve breast pain while breastfeeding via lactationlink.com

Plugged Ducts or Mastitis. Both plugged ducts and infectious mastitis can cause a firm, painful area in one breast, and your plugged duct has probably transitioned to mastitis if you have fever and flu-like symptoms such as body aches and chills. The basic treatment is the same for both situations: keep your milk moving.

Research has shown that it is safe for your full-term, healthy baby to breastfeed while you have plugged ducts or mastitis. Continue to breastfeed often, and change up your feeding positions. Positioning baby’s nose or chin towards the firm, tender area of the breast for will allow for better drainage. Massage the breast from the blocked area towards the nipple while the baby nurses to help move the milk and clear the blockage. Pump and/or hand express the affected breast after feedings to drain the breast as thoroughly as possible and speed healing.

How to relieve breast pain while breastfeeding via lactationlink.com

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More tips for feeling better soon:

  • Talk with your doctor or midwife about using an over-the-counter pain reliever to help with pain. Pain can inhibit milk letdown, so keeping it under control could help encourage better milk removal. Ibuprofen is a good option because it is also an anti-inflammatory and is considered compatible with breastfeeding.
  • Use heat (a shower or hot pack) and gentle massage before feeding to improve milk flow. Use cold packs on the breasts between feeds to help reduce pain and swelling. Lil’ Buds are a great option for this and you can use code LLINK for 10% off.
  • Rest, hydrate, and eat nutritious foods. Put on your robe and jammies and put your feet up! Call in extra help from friends or family members for childcare, carpools, meals, etc.

Contact your healthcare provider if:

  • After 24 hours of home treatment your symptoms are the same or worse
  • You have been running a fever for some time or it suddenly spikes higher
  • You have visible pus in your nipple or milk

Breast pain can be caused by lots of things and also be worrisome and confusing. Don’t hesitate to reach out to an IBCLC if you need help figuring out your situation. We can even help on an eConsult. (Pro-tip: Use you Healthcare Spending Account card to book!) I hope this post gives you the knowledge you need to feel more confident with breastfeeding!

Have you signed up for our free email breastfeeding course?

I think you’ll find it really helpful. Click the image below for more info.

Join our free confident breastfeeding course

Thanks for stopping by,

Get in-person or online help with breastfeeding.

Stephanie Weight Hadfield, BS, IBCLC

Sources:
Amir, L. H. (2014). ABM Clinical Protocol #4: Mastitis, Revised March 2014. Breastfeeding Medicine,9(5), 239-243. doi:10.1089/bfm.2014.9984

Lauwers, J., & Swisher, A. (2011). Counseling the nursing mother: a lactation consultant’s guide (5th ed.). Burlington, MA: Jones & Bartlett Learning.

Mohrbacher, N. (2010). Breastfeeding answers made simple: a guide for helping mothers. Amarillo, TX: Hale Publishing.

How to create a community of support for breastfeeding

By | Breastfeeding, Breastfeeding support, Classes, community breastfeeding support

Hi mamas! I’m Kristin Gourley, IBCLC and mom to 5. I am here today to talk about creating a community around you to feel supported in breastfeeding.

It’s a cruel joke that motherhood, when you are constantly surrounded by children, can be very lonely!  This can be especially true for breastfeeding mothers when their families or friends don’t know how to support their choice to breastfeed.  

An IBCLC shares tips on how to create a community of support to help you meet your breastfeeding goals. || Top 10 tips for breastfeeding…

When I had my first baby, I didn’t have any friends who had breastfed before and didn’t really have any support aside from my husband, who wasn’t exactly knowledgeable about breastfeeding!  My son and I were lucky enough to meet our breastfeeding goals, but if I had taken a breastfeeding class prenatally, I might have avoided some rough experiences and spent less time Googling and questioning!  I might also have made some friends.

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One of the benefits of attending Lactation Link’s in-person breastfeeding class is that you get to meet other moms!  We encourage moms to trade contact information or social media handles to help bridge that loneliness gap that can come during pregnancy and once baby arrives. We still have some openings in our next class, sign up before they sell out!

Even those who do not take our in-person class can benefit from our online breastfeeding classes as well as our support network on Instagram

Click through to learn how I found a community of support. Read More

5 ways family and friends can support a new mom

By | Breastfeeding, Breastfeeding support, breastfeeding tips, community breastfeeding support

The village really seems to mobilize after a baby is born! After birth, mom needs to focus on healing and bonding with baby. In my video classes, moms write down their breastfeeding goals. They also write down two people they know they can turn to for breastfeeding support when they need it.  Family and friends can help reduce stress and provide support in many ways.

  1. Learn how family and friends can give a new mom the support she needs after giving birth so she can focus on bonding and breastfeeding.Bringing meals. Coordinate with family and friends to create a meal train for the family for several days or weeks. Another option is a sending them a meal delivery service to cut down on time spent planning and purchasing food.
  2. Housekeeping. The last thing Mom should be worrying about is housework when she’s bringing home a newborn (whether its her first or fifth!).  Mom’s attention should be kept on trying to rest, breastfeed, and bond with baby. Family and friends can be so helpful by helping out with a few chores around the house.   If you aren’t close by, you can send a gift certificate for a cleaning or laundry service.
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  3. Healthy snacks. If you aren’t close by, sending mom a box of Milkful lactation bars can be super helpful! They are delicious and a healthy, fast snack for mom. Use code LLINK for 15% off!
  4. Make her a breastfeeding basket. While breastfeeding, it’s nice to everything you need within arms reach. A bottle of water, snacks, an extra phone charger, nipple cream and good nursing pads like Bamboobies are some ideas of what to include. (Use code LLINK20 for 20% off Bamboobies!)
  5. Help with older children. If the mom has older kids, this is a great time for playdates so mom can rest with baby. Bringing over kid-friendly snacks and meals is also helpful.
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 What did your family and friends do that helped support you breastfeed and recover after birth? Share in the comments.

Related articles from Lactation Link:

5 Ways Grandparents can support breastfeeding

5 Ways partners can support breastfeeding

How to create a community of support for breastfeeding

 

I’ve created a free e-mail course to help you get breastfeeding started on the right foot! Click the image below for more info.

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Thanks for stopping by,

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Lindsey Shipley, RN, IBCLC

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5 ways partners can support breastfeeding

By | Breastfeeding, Breastfeeding support, breastfeeding tips, community breastfeeding support, Lactation Link team, motherhood

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Hi mamas! I’m Lacey, a certified lactation educator and mother of 3. I am here today to talk about how partners can support a mother in her breastfeeding experience. First I want to share a little of my own experience.

Read the top 5 way partners can support a breastfeeding mother from a mom of 3 and lactation educator. Start with a breastfeeding class…

My support system starts with my partner and I am grateful he gives me the support I need to breastfeed. I was lucky that my mother-in-law breastfed all her babies and being the 2nd oldest of 6 kids, my husband was no stranger to breastfeeding. We knew that breastfeeding was what we wanted to do, even though we weren’t prepared. (Our hospital breastfeeding class was cancelled a couple weeks before my due date, they gave us movie tickets instead — yikes). The first few days were a struggle and he stood by me and encouraged me. He made sure food was made and took care of the household. He brought me books and snacks while I was helping our baby boy through those newborn marathon feeding sessions. He encouraged me to get more breastfeeding support when I had questions and concerns. I am grateful for his support, because in my vulnerable postpartum position, I needed reassurance more than anything.

5 ways partners can support breastfeeding

  1. Attend a breastfeeding class with her. The more you know, the more you can help! You can watch our video classes anytime.  Partners love our classes because they are so convenient and can be watched in the comfort of your own home.  dsc_1535
  2. Take on extra responsibilities.  Mom and baby will be spending lots of time breastfeeding.  Now plan for it. What gives her the most stress? Dishes? Cooking? Laundry? Plan to do more to help out and get creative with additional sources of help.  Consider a bi-monthly housekeeper for a few months.  Consider a meal delivery service.  Think about a diaper delivery service. 
  3. Be a cheerleader. When she is second-guessing herself and her abilities, encourage her. Help her find more resources if needed. We can help with online and in-person consultations.
  4. Baby care. Diapers/burping/babywearing/swaddling are all great things for partners to do! When baby is done feeding, you can help baby burp by holding him/her chest to chest and applying some firm upward pressure with your fingers. You can also be a diaper changing superhero! Babies thrive when being held. When baby doesn’t want to be put down and mom needs a shower, you can wear the baby in a carrier. When my baby was ready for sleep, my husband became the champion swaddler.dsc_1870dsc_1815
    {Ergobaby adapt carrier}

    {Ergobaby Adapt Carrier}

  5. Be there, whenever you can. Many Moms find it supportive when their partner will bring the baby from the bassinet to the mom each time baby wakes to feed during the night. Others really enjoy when their partner can give them a break as needed by babywearing or rocking baby.

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We couldn’t do what we do as moms if it weren’t for great support from our partners! I like to remind partners that the more they are a part of preparation and plans prior to birth, the easier it will be to help after! How did your partner support you? If you are a single mom, how did you find the help and support you needed? Share in the comments.

I’ve created a free e-mail course to help you get breastfeeding started on the right foot! Click the image below for more info.

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Thanks for stopping by,

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Lindsey Shipley, RN, IBCLC

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mom magazine cover

Tuesday Tools with Pregnancy + Newborn Magazine

By | Breastfeeding, Classes, Media

I’m excited to be featured in Pregnancy & Newborn Magazine’s January issue!  I’m debunking a few breastfeeding myths in the article.  Here is a preview of the questions I’m answering:

“Breastfeeding hurts. You’ll just have to get through it.”

“You’ll figure it out as you go.  There’s no need for a prenatal breastfeeding class.”

“Just ask a nurse or lactation specialist at the hospital.”

“At least you tried — just give the baby a bottle.”

“Your mom and sister didn’t produce enough milk, so you probably won’t either.”

Catch my answers and the full article here!  Also, my video breastfeeding classes answer all of these topics in detail!  Available to click and learn and they never expire.  Come say hi on instagram today and make sure you have my ‘Top Ten Tips for Breastfeeding Success’ to start with.

Thanks for coming by,

Lindsey Headshot white with grey

Lindsey Shipley, RN, IBCLC

Mom holding newborn baby

Caffeine + Breastfeeding

By | Breastfeeding, Can I breastfeed if?, Classes

Is it safe to consume caffeine while breastfeeding? I posted a Fact or Fiction about this topic Friday on instagram and many of you had a lot to say!  The Fact or Fiction statement was, “Caffeine should be avoided while breastfeeding.” Here’s a few comments from you guys.

Elizabeth Kallen said, “If I can’t have caffeine after being up all night nursing, then no one is going to get fed, dressed, or loved!”

Bethany Nixon said, “I have heard up to 5 cups regular coffee a day is okay…am I doing that? NO! But if I need a second cup in the afternoon to get over the afternoon slump I will!”

Addison Fagner said, “I don’t know the answer but I do know every time I drink soda, that same night is sooooo hard on my little one! I’ve stopped all caffeine now. Not worth it!”

Here’s my answer to the statement: Fiction.

Based on research studies, very little caffeine actually passes into mother’s milk (1).  Many experts agree that it takes more than 5 cups of caffeinated coffee daily to see effects in the breastfed baby (2).  That is the equivalent of about 300 mg.  Something to keep in mind is that you are aware of each source of caffeine you are consuming.  Examples of caffeine sources include coffee, iced and hot teas, energy drinks, caffeinated soft drinks, and some over-the-counter medications.  Chocolate contains a substance that mimics caffeine and can produce a similar effect in large quantities.

Newborn baby

While these are general guidelines, we know that every baby is different!  It may take a smaller amount to affect some infants.  Here are some symptoms to watch for indicating your infant is overstimulated due to your caffeine intake.

  • Wide-eyed
  • Alert
  • Difficulty staying asleep
  • Unusually fussy

If you are noticing these symptoms, try avoiding caffeine and substituting caffeine-free beverages.  Observe your infant and watch for an improvement.  If the symptoms were due to too much caffeine, your infant should improve within a few days to a week.

I hope this is helpful!  My passion is educating you on all your feeding options so you can reach your goals, whatever they may be!  My video classes are available to click and watch at your convenience.  You can learn in the comfort of you home in your jammies!  Also my classes NEVER EXPIRE! You can watch them over and over.  They also come with a notes outline.  A great promo going out to my newsletter subscribers in the morning.  Sign up to see how to get a free full-size nipple cream from Boob and Baby. The photography in this post is by Lizzy Jean Photography.

More on this topic form Lactation Link:

Can I breastfeed if I drink alcohol?

Thanks for coming by,

Lindsey Shipley, RN, IBCLC

Lindsey Shipley - Lactation Consultant

 

 

 

 

 

 

  1. Berlin, C. et al. (1984). Disposition of dietary caffeine in milk saliva and plasma of lactating women. Pediatrics(73), 59-63.
  2. Nehlig, A. and Debry, G. (1994). Consequences on the newborn of chronic maternal consumption of coffee during gestation and lactation: a review. J Am Coll Nutr(13), 1, 6-21.

Evening fussiness + NuRoo Promo Code

By | Breastfeeding, Classes, Home/Hospital Visits, Recommended Products

Sometimes infants will follow a more consistent feeding pattern throughout the day and then seem to be fussier in the evening and wanting to eat frequently.  Many times mothers will think “What am I doing wrong?” or even, “I must not be making enough milk for my baby’s needs.”  In reality, most likely nothing is wrong!  Especially if baby is having wet and messy diapers, is vigorous at the breast, and gaining weight.  This evening fussiness may be a result of baby being more tired and experiencing over-stimulation.  In certain cases, it could also be due to a slower flow of milk in the evening because milk has been removed efficiently earlier in the day.  This is especially true if Mom has a larger storage capacity and baby tends to sleep longer stretches at night (1).  Not to worry!  This explains why your baby seems to be eating more frequently in the evening — when milk is being removed as its being made, the flow is slower and the volume is less.  Here are a few things to keep in mind about evening fussiness:

#1 – Baby won’t mind having many small meals instead of one large one.

#2 – Mom needs to settle into a comfortable spot and put her milk supply worries to rest.

#3 – Breast compressions/hand expressions during feeding can help maximize milk removal (video tutorials in my video breastfeeding classes).

I’ve also teamed up with NuRoo today to offer a promo code to my readers.  Use code ‘LLINK’ to take 20% off your total purchase today (expires 12/30/16).  They have several items that could come in handy in-between feeds including their pocket, swaddle, and scarf.

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NuRoo Pocket 

The pocket offers full coverage for Mama while allowing for continued skin-to-skin contact with baby.  It comes in black and teal, available in a short-sleeve or 3/4-sleeve option.  The included belt provides safety and support for an infant well beyond the newborn stage!

NuRoo Clouds Lifestyle 3-2

NuRoo swaddler

If you’re looking for a swaddle to soothe baby in-between cuddle time and feeding time, the NuRoo is a great option because it fits newborns up to when baby rolls.  No need to buy multiple sizes, the swaddle grows with baby!  Comes in ten unique and stylish patterns.  Baby can be swaddled at shoulders as pictured, or a bit lower underneath armpits to keep baby warm during play time.

NuRoo Nursing Scarf-2

NuRoo scarf

The NuRoo scarf is a versatile piece that can work as an outfit accessory, also adding coverage and warmth during feeding time.  Comes in five great colors and can be worn during pregnancy, while breastfeeding, and after weaning.

I hope this helps!  Come let me know what you think today on instagram.  Many more great tips like this in my in-person and online video breastfeeding classes.  I also love helping Moms with my in-person consults in their homes, my office, and the hospital.  E-consults are also available via phone or secure video chat.  Arrange personal consultations via email.

Thanks for coming by today,

Lindsey Shipley, RN, IBCLC

 

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  1. Cregan, M., Mitoulas, L., Hartmann, P. (2002). Milk prolactin, feed volume and duration between feeds in women breastfeeding their full-term infants over a 24 h period.  Exp Physiology, 87(2), 207-214.
Lindsey Shipley - Lactation Consultant

Breastfeeding support made easy

By | Classes, Home/Hospital Visits, Recommended Products

When I started Lactation Link, I had a few main goals:

1. To raise awareness that, “Prenatal breastfeeding education is the single-most important factor in breastfeeding initiation and duration” (U.S. Preventive Services Task Force).

2. To make evidence-based breastfeeding education available to as many women as possible!

Making research-based, IBCLC-led classes available anytime is one step in the right direction. Last Tuesday I launched my newly designed website.  One of the newest features is the ability to access my breastfeeding classes in an on-demand viewing option.  This means you can click and watch the courses at anytime, anywhere, in your pajamas!  The classes are listed on this website under ‘Lactation Classes’ then ‘On-demand video classes’.  If using a mobile device, be sure to click the arrows for the drop-down menus to appear.  Here’s a little description of what each class offers:

Breastfeeding Basics

Topics included in this 70-minute course: benefits to mom and baby, anatomy and physiology of breastfeeding, breastmilk composition, let-down reflex, kangaroo mother care, latch, positioning, hand expression, frequency of feeding, nipple care, what to do when baby won’t latch, hunger cues, support and planning, and FAQs. Course contains photo and video demonstration. Breastfeeding Basics is helpful not only for first-time Moms but also women who have breastfed previously.

Intermediate Breastfeeding

This 60-min course is a great follow-up to Breastfeeding Basics.   For all Moms, common problems tend to arise sometime during breastfeeding. That’s why it’s important to have tools and education beyond the basics! Topics include: skin breakdown, jaundice, thrush, mastitis, tongue-tie, nipple shield, increasing milk supply, oversupply, slow weight gain, nursing strikes, biting, surgery/illness, caffeine/alcohol/med consumption, breastfeeding the older baby, introducing solids, etc. Breastfeeding Basics course content not reviewed during this class.

Pumping and Storing breastmilk (previously called ‘Returning to Work and breastfeeding’)

This 45-min course is a must for all moms wanting to learn how to maximize milk expression and the safe handling of breastmilk.  Great for mothers who are planning to return to work! Also very beneficial for those at risk for pre-term delivery, planning travel, or even for the occasional mother/baby separation time.  It discusses employer compliance, how to get your free breastpump through the ACA, pump parts, maximizing milk expression, introducing a bottle, caregiver tips, and managing our many roles as women.  It also covers when and how to start building up a “freezer stockpile” of milk. Safe handling, storage, and warming guidelines for breastmilk.  Breastfeeding Basics and Intermediate Breastfeeding course content not reviewed during this class.

On-demand bundle

Take all 3 of my Breastfeeding courses to best prepare for baby!  Breastfeeding Basics, Intermediate Breastfeeding, and Pumping and Storing Breastmilk will help you get started, manage common problems, and allow you to continue breastfeeding for planned or unplanned times away from baby.  Best value.

FAQs about my classes 

How long do I have to watch the classes?

Once purchased, you have a week to watch!  Once you begin viewing, you can pause and return to viewing as much as you like in 72 hours.  The classes also come with a powerpoint outline to follow along and take notes.  Look here to see how to print the outline with 3 slides per page for note-taking.  These three breastfeeding classes can be purchased individually or as a bundle.

When is a good time to start taking the classes?

Anytime after 12 weeks gestation is a good time to start.  You will take notes with the provided outline and review those many times before delivery.  The classes are also beneficial for those who are postpartum.

I breastfed my other two kids for a year, which class would benefit me?

I’ve had so many Moms who have breastfed previously tell me my courses were beneficial.  It is always a good idea to refresh and many clients tell me they learned new things.  It’s also a good idea to prepare during each pregnancy because every baby is different!  I’ve done many home and hospital visits where clients tell me, “I never had these issues with my previous breastfeeding experiences, this baby is so different!”

In-person classes

Lactation class for moms

Breastfeeding Basics is offered twice a month in Highland, UT.  This interactive class is informative and fun! The live, 90-min format includes the topics: benefits to Mom and baby, anatomy and physiology of breastfeeding, breastmilk composition, let-down reflex, kangaroo mother care, latch, positioning, hand expression, frequency of feeding, nipple care, what to do when baby won’t latch, hunger cues, support and planning, and FAQs. Course contains photo, video, and hands-on demonstration. Life-sized breastfeeding dolls used by attendees. Spouses are welcome to attend. Grab bags for each attendee and also giveaways!  Seats are limited.

Home & Hospital visits

Moms talking with childrenI also offer personal consultations for my clients.  For residents of Utah, I provide home and hospital visits to get breastfeeding off to the right start and help troubleshoot any issues.  Some clients prefer a private breastfeeding class in their home. Others have taken my classes and need more specific information for: multiples, inverted nipples, inducing lactation for adoption, previous breastfeeding issues, etc. Some clients have me come to their home after delivery when they run into problems with latch, slow weight gain, milk supply, etc. Whatever your concern, let me give you the education, tools, and support to be successful breastfeeding your baby!  These appts are booked through my email and I take appts throughout the week. I also take appts in my Highland office generally Wednesday afternoons (1PM, 2PM, 3PM – book here).  You can also contact me for additional availability.

E-consults

Mom sitting at table with laptop

I also offer e-consults through email, phone, or secure video chat.  These are 25-min personal sessions.  This is a great option for evidence-based professional help wherever you are!  Email is done by sending me your bulleted list of questions after registering for an appt (my email is hipaa-compliant).  Phone is just a simple conversation.  Video-chat is done through a clickable link you’ll receive after booking.  E-consult appts on my website are Monday afternoons, but you can always contact me for additional availability.

Newsletter

Signing up for my newsletter is a great way to get all the latest happenings with Lactation Link!   You’ll be alerted to exclusive tips and promos.  Get signed up by entering your email in the right side bar of this home page.

FavoritesBaby breastfeeding

The great thing about choosing to breastfeed is it cuts down on the amount of equipment necessary to feed our babies!  So when my clients ask me what items may be helpful while breastfeeding, I only recommend things that have worked for me as a Mom and Lactation Consultant, as well as things many other breastfeeding Moms have found to work for them.  Take a look at my Favorites section (with enclosed discounts) to see if any of these items may help you.

Education & Support

As a Labor & Delivery RN, I just hated seeing Moms disappointed in their breastfeeding experience!  Many of these Moms didn’t know about the importance of prenatal breastfeeding education, they didn’t have sources of support in place, and they ended up weaning before they were ready.  With breastfeeding, its not a matter of if but when issues will arise (big or small).  The question is, will you have the tools to weather the storm!  Getting all the education you can, and having a solid source of support is so important in reaching your breastfeeding goals.  I’m here to be that source for you!  Thanks for coming by today,

Lindsey Shipley - Lactation Consultant

 

xoxo ~ Lindsey, RN, IBCLC

 

 I’ve created this great e-mail course to help you get breastfeeding started on the right foot! Click the image below for more info.

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