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get answers to breastfeeding questions from a lactation consultant

Lactation Link featured on Romper

By | Breastfeeding, breastfeeding tips, Features, Media

Today, one of our IBCLCs, Kristin Gourley is answering questions about breastfeeding on Romper. She writes about the interactions between breastfeeding and birth control, breastfeeding while pregnant and gives tips on weaning.

answers to breastfeeding questions from a lactation consultant“Weaning is hard,” Gourley says. “Some moms experience some hormonal swings and all-over-the-place emotions after weaning. It should pass in a few weeks, but that may be playing into your feelings. It’s hard not to second guess ourselves as parents with so many different decisions.” She suggests that if you want to try breastfeeding again, you may be able to rebound your supply and get baby back to breast with the help of an IBCLC. “But it’s OK to stay weaned and to enjoy your new relationship with your baby Just because it’s different doesn’t mean it’s not as close,” Gourley says.

Read more at Romper.

Have you signed up yet for our free Confident Breastfeeding Course? Click the image below for more info.

6-dayThanks for stopping by,

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Lindsey Shipley, RN, IBCLC

Reasons & solutions for nipple pain

By | Breastfeeding, Breastfeeding support, breastfeeding tips, Lactation Link team
reasons and solutions for breastfeeding nipple pain from lactationlink.com

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You may have read on our Instagram that breastfeeding should not be painful. Like any physical pain, nipple pain indicates that something is not right. However, some Moms still experience pain and discomfort.  You are not alone!  Here are the most common reasons that moms I see are suffering from nipple pain and how to help.

  1. Tenderness immediately postpartum.  It can be normal to experience tenderness right after baby latches on when you first begin breastfeeding. The hormones released during and immediately after birth can cause nipple tenderness as well.
  2. Poor positioning.  If baby isn’t tummy-to-tummy with you, it can cause unnecessary pulling on your nipple or poor alignment for baby which can be very uncomfortable.  Check out our Breastfeeding Basics 101 class for a great breakdown of how to position baby for the best latch.
  3. Shallow latch.  It’s called breastfeeding instead of nipple feeding for a reason!  If baby doesn’t have enough breast tissue in his/her mouth your nipple can be pinched and even sustain damage.  Waiting for baby to open wide can be a huge lifesaver! If you feel constant nipple pinching while nursing, seek out help! A lactation consultant explains the common reasons behind breastfeeding nipple pain and solutions to remedy them. Get a promo code for a…
  4. Milk blister or bleb.  This is like a plugged duct right at the opening of a nipple pore.  It can be very painful, but warm compresses and frequent nursing are great solutions.  Some coconut oil on a cotton swab applied to the area can also help to soften the clog.
  5. Vasospasm.  This happens most to women who have experience ‘Reynaud’s Syndrome’ – a condition that causes poor circulation and your hands and feet to feel cold most of the time.  Using a warm heating pad can help alleviate that discomfort, but there are also medications that can help if needed.  If you have burning or shooting pains during and in-between feedings, you may need a personal consultation.
  6. Infection.  A bacterial or yeast infection that happens after the nipple has been wounded can cause persistent pain even if latch and positioning have corrected the original problem.  Depending on the extent of the infection, a nipple cream can help or you may need a prescription medication. It’s best to consult your healthcare provider and an IBCLC if you think you have an infection.
reasons and solutions for breastfeeding nipple pain from lactationlink.com

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For nipple pain caused by things that respond to over-the-counter creams, we recommend checking out Upspring Wellmom Organic Coconut Oil Nipple Balm.  Coconut oil has been proven to be moisturizing, antimicrobial, AND antifungal (1)– a great trifecta to protect sore nipples!  Use code LLINK for 15% on their website (this expires 12/14/16!). If you need latch or positioning help, check out our video class bundle for great instruction and tips or schedule a consult for personalized help.

Find more about preventing nipple pain in our top 10 tips!

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Thanks for stopping by,

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Kristin Gourley, BS, IBCLC

Sources

(1) Evangalista, M.T., Abad-Casintahan, F., Lopez-Villafuerte, L. (2014). The effect of topical virgin coconut oil on SCORAD index, transepidermal water loss, and skincapacitance in mild to moderate pediatric atopic dermatitis: a randomized, double-blind, clinical trial. International Journal of Dermatology, 53(1), 100-108.

(2) Shilling, M., Matt, L., Rubin, E., Visitacion, M.P., Haller, N.A., Grey, S.F., Woolverton, C.J. (2013). Antimicrobial effects of virgin coconut oil and its medium-chain fatty acids on Clostridium difficile. Journal of Medicinal Food, 16(12), 1079-1085.

(3) Verallo-Rowel, V.M., Dillague, K.M., Syah-Tjundawan, B.S. (2008). Novel antibacterial and emollient effects of coconut and virgin olive oils in adult atopic dermatitis. Dermatitis, 19(6), 308-315.

How to create a community of support for breastfeeding

By | Breastfeeding, Breastfeeding support, Classes, community breastfeeding support

Hi mamas! I’m Kristin Gourley, IBCLC and mom to 5. I am here today to talk about creating a community around you to feel supported in breastfeeding.

It’s a cruel joke that motherhood, when you are constantly surrounded by children, can be very lonely!  This can be especially true for breastfeeding mothers when their families or friends don’t know how to support their choice to breastfeed.  

An IBCLC shares tips on how to create a community of support to help you meet your breastfeeding goals. || Top 10 tips for breastfeeding…

When I had my first baby, I didn’t have any friends who had breastfed before and didn’t really have any support aside from my husband, who wasn’t exactly knowledgeable about breastfeeding!  My son and I were lucky enough to meet our breastfeeding goals, but if I had taken a breastfeeding class prenatally, I might have avoided some rough experiences and spent less time Googling and questioning!  I might also have made some friends.

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One of the benefits of attending Lactation Link’s in-person breastfeeding class is that you get to meet other moms!  We encourage moms to trade contact information or social media handles to help bridge that loneliness gap that can come during pregnancy and once baby arrives. We still have some openings in our next class, sign up before they sell out!

Even those who do not take our in-person class can benefit from our online breastfeeding classes as well as our support network on Instagram

Click through to learn how I found a community of support. Read More

5 ways family and friends can support a new mom

By | Breastfeeding, Breastfeeding support, breastfeeding tips, community breastfeeding support

The village really seems to mobilize after a baby is born! After birth, mom needs to focus on healing and bonding with baby. In my video classes, moms write down their breastfeeding goals. They also write down two people they know they can turn to for breastfeeding support when they need it.  Family and friends can help reduce stress and provide support in many ways.

  1. Learn how family and friends can give a new mom the support she needs after giving birth so she can focus on bonding and breastfeeding.Bringing meals. Coordinate with family and friends to create a meal train for the family for several days or weeks. Another option is a sending them a meal delivery service to cut down on time spent planning and purchasing food.
  2. Housekeeping. The last thing Mom should be worrying about is housework when she’s bringing home a newborn (whether its her first or fifth!).  Mom’s attention should be kept on trying to rest, breastfeed, and bond with baby. Family and friends can be so helpful by helping out with a few chores around the house.   If you aren’t close by, you can send a gift certificate for a cleaning or laundry service.
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  3. Healthy snacks. If you aren’t close by, sending mom a box of Milkful lactation bars can be super helpful! They are delicious and a healthy, fast snack for mom. Use code LLINK for 15% off!
  4. Make her a breastfeeding basket. While breastfeeding, it’s nice to everything you need within arms reach. A bottle of water, snacks, an extra phone charger, nipple cream and good nursing pads like Bamboobies are some ideas of what to include. (Use code LLINK20 for 20% off Bamboobies!)
  5. Help with older children. If the mom has older kids, this is a great time for playdates so mom can rest with baby. Bringing over kid-friendly snacks and meals is also helpful.
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 What did your family and friends do that helped support you breastfeed and recover after birth? Share in the comments.

Related articles from Lactation Link:

5 Ways Grandparents can support breastfeeding

5 Ways partners can support breastfeeding

How to create a community of support for breastfeeding

 

I’ve created a free e-mail course to help you get breastfeeding started on the right foot! Click the image below for more info.

6-day

Thanks for stopping by,

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Lindsey Shipley, RN, IBCLC

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5 ways grandparents can support breastfeeding

By | Breastfeeding, Breastfeeding support, breastfeeding tips, Classes, community breastfeeding support, motherhood

Hi mamas! I’m Lacey, a certified lactation educator and mom of three. I’m here today to talk about how grandparents and family members can support a new or seasoned mom while she is breastfeeding her new baby.

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I am grateful I had family that supported my decision to breastfeed. Mothers and grandmothers can be very influential to a new mother. By driving me to breastfeeding consultations and sometimes latching the baby herself, my mother gave me the strength and courage to keep going.  When I was struggling, she recalled what helped her through breastfeeding struggles. She encouraged and supported me and when she didn’t have the answers, she helped me find them. 

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How grandparents can help support breastfeeding

  1. Buy a breastfeeding class off mom’s registry. Our breastfeeding video classes are available to be added to a Babylist registry! Our classes cover everything from positioning, latch and common problems with breastfeeding.
  2. Encourage and uplift. Support her decision to breastfeed by encouraging and complimenting her on the gift she is giving her baby.
  3. Help around the house. Help with meals and housework. If mom has other children, take them for a fun outing.
  4. Be the door bouncer. Well-meaning family and friends might want to stop by the hospital or home to see new mom and baby. If the new mom isn’t comfortable with visitors yet, be the “bouncer” so mom doesn’t have to turn away them away herself.
  5. Cuddle and swaddle baby. Sometimes grandparents want to help by feeding baby for mom. In the early days, it’s usually best that baby be at the breast to help encourage a healthy milk supply. Support the new mom by bonding with baby after a feed when mom needs a break.

Learn 5 ways grandmas can support a new breastfeeding mother. Learn how grandmas can be the bouncer. Send this to your mom, thank us later!

How did your mother or grandmother help you breastfeed? Share in the comments.

I’ve created a free e-mail course to help you get breastfeeding started on the right foot! Click the image below for more info.

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Photos by Cate Johnson.

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Lacey Parr, CLEC

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Sources

Mueffelmann, Rebecca E. , Racine, Elizabeth F., Warren-Findlow, Jan, & Coffmann, Maren J.,  (2015). Perceived infant feeding preferences of significant family members and mothers’ intentions to exclusively breastfeed. Journal of Human Lactation, vol. 31 (no. 3), 479-489. 

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5 ways partners can support breastfeeding

By | Breastfeeding, Breastfeeding support, breastfeeding tips, community breastfeeding support, Lactation Link team, motherhood

 

Read the top 5 way partners can support a breastfeeding mother from a mom of 3 and lactation educator. Start with a breastfeeding class…

5 ways partners can support breastfeeding

  1. Take a breastfeeding class together. The more you know, the more you can help! You can watch our video classes anytime.  Partners love our classes because they are so convenient and can be watched in the comfort of your own home.  dsc_1535
  2. Take on extra responsibilities.  Mom and baby will be spending lots of time breastfeeding.  Now plan for it. What gives her the most stress? Dishes? Cooking? Laundry? Plan to do more to help out and get creative with additional sources of help.  Consider a bi-monthly housekeeper for a few months.  Consider a meal delivery service.  Think about a diaper delivery service. 
  3. Be a cheerleader. When she is second-guessing herself and her abilities, encourage her. Help her find more resources if needed. We can help with online and in-person consultations.
  4. Baby care. Diapers/burping/babywearing/swaddling are all great things for partners to do! When baby is done feeding, you can help baby burp by holding him/her chest to chest and applying some firm upward pressure with your fingers. You can also be a diaper changing superhero! Babies thrive when being held. When baby doesn’t want to be put down and mom needs a shower, you can wear the baby in a carrier. When my baby was ready for sleep, my husband became the champion swaddler.dsc_1870dsc_1815
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    {Ergobaby Adapt Carrier}

  5. Be there, whenever you can. Many Moms find it supportive when their partner will bring the baby from the bassinet to the mom each time baby wakes to feed during the night. Others really enjoy when their partner can give them a break as needed by babywearing or rocking baby.

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We couldn’t do what we do as moms if it weren’t for great support from our partners! I like to remind partners that the more they are a part of preparation and plans prior to birth, the easier it will be to help after! How did your partner support you? If you are a single mom, how did you find the help and support you needed? Share in the comments.

I’ve created a free e-mail course to help you get breastfeeding started on the right foot! Click the image below for more info.

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Thanks for stopping by,

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Lindsey Shipley, RN, IBCLC

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how to get a free breast pump through your insurance

How to get a free breast pump from your insurance

By | Breastfeeding, Breastfeeding support, breastfeeding tips, Recommended Products

Hi mamas! We are often asked for advice on the best breast pump and pump accessories so we are excited to share this post with you today! We want all moms to feel like they can meet their breastfeeding goals and many times pumping can help with that! There are lots of reasons women choose to express and save their breastmilk – some are returning to work, some are dealing with unexpected complications or prematurity, others are just preparing for some mother-baby separation time.  Whatever the reason, we are here to help!  Expressing breastmilk through a combination of hand expression and using a breast pump can help maintain a good milk supply even mom and baby are separated.

The easiest way to get a free breast pump! Most moms don't know that you can get a free breast pump from...

As a labor and delivery RN and lactation specialist I know Moms have a lot of questions when it comes to pumping — “When should I start?”  “What’s the best time to pump?”  “What if I get more milk out of one side than the other?”  “How long is the milk good for?”  And so many more!  I answer all of these questions in my Pumping and Storing Breastmilk video class.  It’s a blueprint for how to maximize your milk output with each session and also how to safely store, thaw, and deliver breastmilk to your infant.  After you’ve taken that class, it’s a great idea to get your breast pump ordered.  Many companies allow you to order your pump as soon as your second trimester.  Below is an easy guide to getting your free breast pump through insurance.

dsc_0764Through the Affordable Care Act, breastfeeding supplies are covered by most insurance plans.  So, in most cases, you can get a double electric breast pump from your insurance for free! Even though it’s covered, some women don’t know they have that benefit or how to order it. We’ve done the homework for you so check out the steps below on how to get your free pump from your insurance!

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Follow these steps to get a breast pump from your insurance…

  1. Visit 1Natural Way.  They’ve made the process super simple and have a wide selection of really great pumping accessories.
  2. Click ‘Get Started Now’. Have your insurance card ready so you can upload a picture of it after filling out the form.
  3. 1Natural Way will determine your eligibility–meaning, they will find out if your insurance works with them. They will also determine if your insurance requires a co-pay for your pump (most don’t).
  4. You will then receive an email where you can select your breast pump style options.
  5. 1Natural Way will obtain a prescription for the pump on your behalf. This is another great thing about 1Natural Way, they will obtain the prescription for you!
  6. The pump ships to your door!  

Easy-peasy! 

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I’ve created a free e-mail course to help you get breastfeeding started on the right foot! Click the image below for more info.

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Thanks for coming by,

Lindsey Shipley, RN, IBCLC

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mom magazine cover

Tuesday Tools with Pregnancy + Newborn Magazine

By | Breastfeeding, Classes, Media

I’m excited to be featured in Pregnancy & Newborn Magazine’s January issue!  I’m debunking a few breastfeeding myths in the article.  Here is a preview of the questions I’m answering:

“Breastfeeding hurts. You’ll just have to get through it.”

“You’ll figure it out as you go.  There’s no need for a prenatal breastfeeding class.”

“Just ask a nurse or lactation specialist at the hospital.”

“At least you tried — just give the baby a bottle.”

“Your mom and sister didn’t produce enough milk, so you probably won’t either.”

Catch my answers and the full article here!  Also, my video breastfeeding classes answer all of these topics in detail!  Available to click and learn and they never expire.  Come say hi on instagram today and make sure you have my ‘Top Ten Tips for Breastfeeding Success’ to start with.

Thanks for coming by,

Lindsey Headshot white with grey

Lindsey Shipley, RN, IBCLC

Lactation Link Classes + Consults

By | Breastfeeding, Classes, Home/Hospital Visits, Recommended Products

We’ve changed a few things since launching our video breastfeeding classes this last August.  With some great suggestions and survey feedback, we came up with a few ways to make viewing the classes even more convenient!  Lactation Link has services to help prepare you prenatally as well as provide breastfeeding teaching and support once baby arrives.

Video Breastfeeding Classes

mother working on a computerOur video classes are now available to view as many times as you like and do not expire after purchase.  Each class also come with a printable outline convenient for note-taking!  The three available classes are Breastfeeding Basics, Intermediate Breastfeeding, and Pumping and Storing Breastmilk.  Read the course descriptions here.  Each class is $39.99 or you can purchase all three in a bundle for $89.99.  These classes can be taken anytime after 12 weeks in pregnancy.  They can also be taken after delivery.

In-person Breastfeeding Basics Class

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I offer a live format of Breastfeeding Basics 1-2 times monthly in Highland, UT.  This is a 2-hour course that offers interaction and hands-on demonstration.  We use life-sized baby dolls for position practice and there is a Q&A portion at the end.  There are also grab-bags for each attendee and giveaways from some of my favorite baby shops.  Opportunity to secure a personal home/hospital consultation after the class.  Class size is limited and kept small to allow for questions.  Upcoming dates are 10/24, 11/5, and 11/14.  This class can be taken anytime after 12 weeks in pregnancy.  This gives opportunity to go over notes many times and take the other 2 courses (Intermediate Breastfeeding and Pumping and Storing Breastmilk).  If you are interested in having a live group class taught in your state/area, please email us!

E-consults

Sometimes its tough to get immediate breastfeeding assistance when you hit a snag! An e-consult is an easy, convenient, and informative way to get the answers you need – now! These 25-minute sessions can be done through email, phone, or Secure Video. Secure Video is a HIPAA compliant video chat. After securing your appointment you’ll receive a link to join our protected, personal consultation.  Appointment times are listed here.  Email me for urgent appointments – lindsey@lactationlink.com

In-person home/hospital visits

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Many clients feel reassured by having me plan to be at their place of delivery shortly after baby arrives to ensure a proper latch, provide hands-on support, and answer questions. I also provide home visits before or after baby is born for a variety of reasons. Some clients prefer a private breastfeeding class in their home. Others have taken my Breastfeeding Basics class and need more specific information for: multiples, inverted nipples, previous breastfeeding issues, etc. Some clients have me come to their home after delivery when they run into problems with latch, slow weight gain, milk supply, etc.  Clients who have taken my classes have priority for the limited personal consultation appointments. These appointments are reserved via email – contact lindsey@lactationlink.com to arrange.  I am based out of Highland, UT, and generally serve Utah and Salt Lake counties. Contact for appts outside those areas.

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Hope this helps and you find these services a valuable resource.  My goal is to get research-based information to as many women as possible.  As a RN and IBCLC-lactation specialist, I love to educate women on their options so they can guide their experience and reach their goals.  I believe that “Mama Knows Best”, I’m just here to support and help!  Make sure you come say hi on instagram today and download my free PDF – “Top Ten Tips for Breastfeeding Success” link available in my bio.  I also love to see class reviews posted on your own page with the hashtag #lactationlink and tagging me @lactationlink so I can see them!

I’ve created this great e-mail course to help you get breastfeeding started on the right foot! Click the image below for more info.

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Thanks for coming by today.

xo ~ Lindsey, RN, IBCLC

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