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lactation specialist Archives - Lactation Link

Should I wake my baby to breastfeed?

By | Breastfeeding, Breastfeeding support, breastfeeding tips, Lactation Link team

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Hi mamas! I’m Lacey Parr, a certified lactation educator counselor and mom of 3. One our most commonly asked questions at Lactation Link is whether or not you should wake your baby to feed if they begin to sleep in longer intervals. Mamas and babies need good rest! My hope is that learning when to wake a sleeping baby or when to let them sleep will help bring you some more confidence.

While most babies will need to feed frequently throughout the night for several months, some will begin to sleep longer intervals. It is important to...

Should I wake my baby to breastfeed?

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{Undercover Mama nursing dress} Use code LLINK for 20% off!

Before 2 weeks

Before baby turns two weeks old and regains their birth weight, it is important to keep waking baby to feed. Babies at this age need to be fed around the clock every 2-3 hours or 8-12+ times in 24 hours. A newborn’s stomach can only hold a few teaspoons and must eat frequently to satisfy their hunger. This time is also crucial in establishing your milk supply, so frequent breastfeeding is key. Keep feeding on baby’s cues, whenever they are, and throughout the night.

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After 2 weeks

While most babies will need to feed frequently throughout the night for several months, some will begin to sleep longer intervals. After baby regains his/her birth weight (around 10-14 days of life), it is normally safe to allow baby to sleep longer intervals (1). Some moms like to wake at this time to pump or hand express to relieve any pressure they might feel in their breasts. This can be a good time to start saving milk to return to work or school. But other moms take this time to get more sleep. Do whatever works for you and your family! If your breasts do feel full and you need to express, but you worry about having to wake every night to relieve that pressure, know that this will not last forever! Try expressing just long enough to relieve the pressure and your breasts will adjust. Any experiences with this? Share in the comments.

Get more breastfeeding wisdom and answers to commonly asked questions with our Confident Breastfeeding Course. Click the image below.

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Thanks for stopping by,

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Lacey Parr, BS, CLEC

Sources

(1) Lauwers, J. & Swisher, A.. (2011). Breastfeeding in the early weeks. Counseling the Nursing Mother (5th ed., pp. 378). Boston, MA: Jones and Bartlett Publishers.

Can I breastfeed if I have surgery?

By | Breastfeeding, Breastfeeding support, breastfeeding tips, Can I breastfeed if?

can i breastfeed if i have surgery? via lactationlink.com

Today we are continuing our series, “Can I breastfeed if…?” It’s not uncommon for moms to need to undergo surgery while she is breastfeeding. I myself had 3 unexpected surgeries while breastfeeding my daughter. To be able to breastfeed after surgery can be a way to help mom feel that she is back to normal after her procedure. I hope this post can reassure you that breastfeeding does not need to be interrupted for surgery.

Learn how and when breastfeeding is compatible w/ surgery. Many moms are able to breastfeed after surgery without problems. Can I breastfeed…

Can I breastfeed if I have to have surgery?

Almost always, yes! There is no contraindication to breastfeeding while fasting if that is necessary before your procedure.  Many mothers worry about sedation medications or anesthesia affecting their infants but, if you have a healthy baby, once you are awake enough to hold and nurse your baby, the anesthesia has left your system enough to not be an issue for baby(1).  Also, many prescription and over-the-counter pain medications are compatible with breastfeeding if that is necessary.  

Can I breastfeed if I need surgery? via Lactationlink.com || Breastfeeding support and education

As you can see, breastfeeding is compatible with most situations!  Even if breastfeeding has to be stopped for a short period of time, it can usually be resumed.  If you need information about pumping and storing for a planned breastfeeding break, be sure to check out our Pumping and Storing breastmilk video class. If you have further questions or a complex situation, don’t hesitate to schedule a consult to figure out how to best meet your breastfeeding goals no matter what is going on!

Thanks for stopping by,

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Lindsey Shipley, RN, IBCLC

Sources

(1) Montgomery, A., & Hale, T. W. (2012). ABM Clinical Protocol #15: Analgesia and Anesthesia for the Breastfeeding Mother, Revised 2012. Breastfeeding Medicine,7(6), 547-553. doi:10.1089/bfm.2012.9977

5 ways family and friends can support a new mom

By | Breastfeeding, Breastfeeding support, breastfeeding tips, community breastfeeding support

The village really seems to mobilize after a baby is born! After birth, mom needs to focus on healing and bonding with baby. In my video classes, moms write down their breastfeeding goals. They also write down two people they know they can turn to for breastfeeding support when they need it.  Family and friends can help reduce stress and provide support in many ways.

  1. Learn how family and friends can give a new mom the support she needs after giving birth so she can focus on bonding and breastfeeding.Bringing meals. Coordinate with family and friends to create a meal train for the family for several days or weeks. Another option is a sending them a meal delivery service to cut down on time spent planning and purchasing food.
  2. Housekeeping. The last thing Mom should be worrying about is housework when she’s bringing home a newborn (whether its her first or fifth!).  Mom’s attention should be kept on trying to rest, breastfeed, and bond with baby. Family and friends can be so helpful by helping out with a few chores around the house.   If you aren’t close by, you can send a gift certificate for a cleaning or laundry service.
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  3. Healthy snacks. If you aren’t close by, sending mom a box of Milkful lactation bars can be super helpful! They are delicious and a healthy, fast snack for mom. Use code LLINK for 15% off!
  4. Make her a breastfeeding basket. While breastfeeding, it’s nice to everything you need within arms reach. A bottle of water, snacks, an extra phone charger, nipple cream and good nursing pads like Bamboobies are some ideas of what to include. (Use code LLINK20 for 20% off Bamboobies!)
  5. Help with older children. If the mom has older kids, this is a great time for playdates so mom can rest with baby. Bringing over kid-friendly snacks and meals is also helpful.
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 What did your family and friends do that helped support you breastfeed and recover after birth? Share in the comments.

Related articles from Lactation Link:

5 Ways Grandparents can support breastfeeding

5 Ways partners can support breastfeeding

How to create a community of support for breastfeeding

 

I’ve created a free e-mail course to help you get breastfeeding started on the right foot! Click the image below for more info.

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Thanks for stopping by,

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Lindsey Shipley, RN, IBCLC

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Breastfeeding Q&A with Munchkin on Facebook

By | Breastfeeding, Recommended Products

Tomorrow I’ll be answering questions LIVE over on Munchkin’s Facebook page.  Here is the link to attend the event!  Every person who asks a question during the Q&A is entered to win a $200 gift set from Munchkin.  Make sure you are following both Lactation Link and Munchkin on Facebook to have access! See you there – can’t wait to answer your questions.

Thanks for coming by,

Lindsey Shipley, RN, IBCLC

 

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Tuesday Tools with Pregnancy + Newborn Magazine

By | Breastfeeding, Classes, Media

I’m excited to be featured in Pregnancy & Newborn Magazine’s January issue!  I’m debunking a few breastfeeding myths in the article.  Here is a preview of the questions I’m answering:

“Breastfeeding hurts. You’ll just have to get through it.”

“You’ll figure it out as you go.  There’s no need for a prenatal breastfeeding class.”

“Just ask a nurse or lactation specialist at the hospital.”

“At least you tried — just give the baby a bottle.”

“Your mom and sister didn’t produce enough milk, so you probably won’t either.”

Catch my answers and the full article here!  Also, my video breastfeeding classes answer all of these topics in detail!  Available to click and learn and they never expire.  Come say hi on instagram today and make sure you have my ‘Top Ten Tips for Breastfeeding Success’ to start with.

Thanks for coming by,

Lindsey Headshot white with grey

Lindsey Shipley, RN, IBCLC

Mom holding newborn baby

Caffeine + Breastfeeding

By | Breastfeeding, Can I breastfeed if?, Classes

Is it safe to consume caffeine while breastfeeding? I posted a Fact or Fiction about this topic Friday on instagram and many of you had a lot to say!  The Fact or Fiction statement was, “Caffeine should be avoided while breastfeeding.” Here’s a few comments from you guys.

Elizabeth Kallen said, “If I can’t have caffeine after being up all night nursing, then no one is going to get fed, dressed, or loved!”

Bethany Nixon said, “I have heard up to 5 cups regular coffee a day is okay…am I doing that? NO! But if I need a second cup in the afternoon to get over the afternoon slump I will!”

Addison Fagner said, “I don’t know the answer but I do know every time I drink soda, that same night is sooooo hard on my little one! I’ve stopped all caffeine now. Not worth it!”

Here’s my answer to the statement: Fiction.

Based on research studies, very little caffeine actually passes into mother’s milk (1).  Many experts agree that it takes more than 5 cups of caffeinated coffee daily to see effects in the breastfed baby (2).  That is the equivalent of about 300 mg.  Something to keep in mind is that you are aware of each source of caffeine you are consuming.  Examples of caffeine sources include coffee, iced and hot teas, energy drinks, caffeinated soft drinks, and some over-the-counter medications.  Chocolate contains a substance that mimics caffeine and can produce a similar effect in large quantities.

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While these are general guidelines, we know that every baby is different!  It may take a smaller amount to affect some infants.  Here are some symptoms to watch for indicating your infant is overstimulated due to your caffeine intake.

  • Wide-eyed
  • Alert
  • Difficulty staying asleep
  • Unusually fussy

If you are noticing these symptoms, try avoiding caffeine and substituting caffeine-free beverages.  Observe your infant and watch for an improvement.  If the symptoms were due to too much caffeine, your infant should improve within a few days to a week.

I hope this is helpful!  My passion is educating you on all your feeding options so you can reach your goals, whatever they may be!  My video classes are available to click and watch at your convenience.  You can learn in the comfort of you home in your jammies!  Also my classes NEVER EXPIRE! You can watch them over and over.  They also come with a notes outline.  A great promo going out to my newsletter subscribers in the morning.  Sign up to see how to get a free full-size nipple cream from Boob and Baby. The photography in this post is by Lizzy Jean Photography.

More on this topic form Lactation Link:

Can I breastfeed if I drink alcohol?

Thanks for coming by,

Lindsey Shipley, RN, IBCLC

Lindsey Shipley - Lactation Consultant

 

 

 

 

 

 

  1. Berlin, C. et al. (1984). Disposition of dietary caffeine in milk saliva and plasma of lactating women. Pediatrics(73), 59-63.
  2. Nehlig, A. and Debry, G. (1994). Consequences on the newborn of chronic maternal consumption of coffee during gestation and lactation: a review. J Am Coll Nutr(13), 1, 6-21.
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Tuesday Tools – How to stop biting

By | Breastfeeding, Classes, Home/Hospital Visits, Recommended Products

I’ve had a lot of Moms contact me recently about tips to prevent their infant from biting while breastfeeding.  This can really be an issue as infants get a little older and start to cut teeth.  I talk about this more in my Intermediate Breastfeeding video class.

Easing the discomfort of teething

Wearing a silicone teething necklace.  I like these Chewable Charm necklaces because they are safe for baby and also look cute for daily wear!

baby chewing on teething necklace

Offering cold finger foods (frozen peas, blueberries) or also freezing breastmilk in an ice cube tray and offering it to baby in a mesh feeder.

What to do when baby is biting

Many infants will bite towards the end of a feed when they become bored and want to play.  If you start observing closely, you should be able to recognize this playful behavior coming on and stop the feed before biting occurs.  You can do this by breaking suction and turning baby’s attention to a book or toy.  Make sure baby has gotten what he needs from the breast and don’t be alarmed if your infant wants to ‘snack’ more during the teething period.  By ‘snacking’ I mean shorter, more frequent feedings.  If biting ends up happening, you want to break suction and tell your baby “No, no, no,” repeated 3 times.  Be cautious not to yell or startle your baby as this could cause a nursing strike (breast refusal for 2-7 days).  Baby can come back to breast after this, but if biting continues, break suction, say “No, no, no,” 3 times and set baby down somewhere safe and walk away for a minute or two.  When you return, talk to your baby, letting him/her know that biting hurts, and mommy can’t feed when they bite.  It may seem silly, but with consistency this should do the trick!

baby sucking on his mom's breast

I hope this helps!  My Intermediate Breastfeeding class is a great follow-up to Breastfeeding Basics because it addresses so many common issues like sore/cracked nipples, mastitis, thrush, jaundice, tongue-tie, over supply, slow weight gain, boosting milk supply, how to introduce solids, and much more!  Great information you don’t want to miss out on.  I also offer home/hospital consultations (first priority to those who have taken my classes) as well as e-consults for my clients via secure video chat.  Email me to arrange.  Come say hi on instagram today!  Don’t forget about our current promo code for 25% off your entire Loyal Hana clothing purchase.  Check out the previous post for the code and details.  The photography in this post is by Janae Kristen photography.

Thanks for coming by today,

Lindsey Shipley, RN, IBCLC

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Friday Favs – Loyal Hana

By | Breastfeeding, Classes, Recommended Products

Recently some of my clients introduced me to the brand Loyal Hana.  Today they are offering 25% off to my readers with the PROMO CODE ‘LLINK’.  It’s a collection of stylish, comfortable and functional clothes for the expectant or nursing mother.  Stylish clothes while breastfeeding?  Yep, it’s true.  Shelley, the owner and designer behind the Loyal Hana line has a vision that you don’t have to sacrifice style while pregnant or breastfeeding.  Kudos to her for providing breastfeeding mamas lots of options – from tees to sweaters to dresses and jumpsuits.  My favorite part?  All her items come equipped with built-in zippers on each side of the chest for easy access to breastfeeding.  You can go from play time to breastfeeding easily and comfortably, without completely disrobing!  Let me show you what I mean.

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Here are a few of my clients wearing Loyal Hana tops at a recent play date with their little ones.

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Notice the discreet built-in zipper on the ‘Alex’ sweater in grey (Upper left shoulder).

baby breastfeeding with a breastfeeding sweater

Jenica is using the side-lying position to breastfeed her sweet baby girl, and the ‘Alex’ sweater maintains a lot of coverage throughout.  No untucking/re-tucking undershirts or stretching out your top by pulling it up or down for breastfeeding access.

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Jessica and Lily easily go from playtime to feeding session with the Audrey top.

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Jessica is using the cross-cradle position here (nursing pillow is Ergobaby).

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Hope you enjoyed this post and take a minute to checkout Loyal Hana’s line and don’t forget to use promo code ‘LLINK’ for 25% off your total purchase.  Learn about more breastfeeding positions in my video breastfeeding classes and in-person breastfeeding classes.  Come say hi on instagram today. Photography in this post by Janae Kristen photography.

Thanks for coming by today,

Lindsey Shipley, RN, IBCLC

Lindsey Shipley with black jacket

Elevator Breastfeeding Position

By | Breastfeeding, Classes, Home/Hospital Visits

Many unexpected things can come up during lactation.  You can hit bumps early on, a few weeks in, or even months or years into your breastfeeding experience.  In addition to breastfeeding issues which require education and support, sometimes maternal illness can occur.  Sometimes an illness, incision,  or soreness will make it tough for you to sit upright or even turn comfortably.  If you find yourself saying, “My baby and I are healthy and I’ll just stay away from any surgeries while breastfeeding,” keep in mind – most women who experience sudden illness or have surgery aren’t planning on it!  To relay a personal experience, I had 3 unexpected surgeries while breastfeeding my daughter.  It’s nice to be equipped with ways to continue breastfeeding in the face of unexpected obstacles.  Today I wanted to share a breastfeeding position that may come in handy if you find yourself recovering from something while breastfeeding.

Elevator Position

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The Elevator position allows you to breastfeed on both breasts without having to roll over to change positions.  For this Mama, she started out breastfeeding in this sidelying position on her left breast.  When baby was done on the left side, we placed a pillow beneath baby.  The pillow acted as an elevator, allowing baby to access the second side (in this case right breast) without having to change positions or roll over.

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Same principles apply as in any breastfeeding position we use – make sure baby is tummy-to-tummy with you with no space in between.  You can place a body pillow behind your back for comfort and support.  You can also place a roll behind baby’s back to help keep them facing you.  Here, we are using a thin muslin blanket rolled up.

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Ofcourse I hope you never find yourself with an illness, injury, surgery, or recovery anytime — let alone when you are breastfeeding.  But life happens!  Having as much knowledge and support as possible will increase your chances of getting through whatever comes your way.

Many more great tips like this in my breastfeeding  classes.  My video classes are available anytime – they never expire, can be watched over and over, and you can learn in the comfort of your own home!  Anytime after 12 weeks in pregnancy is a great time to start preparing and they also come with a notes outline.  My in-person classes are held in Highland, UT – upcoming dates are 12/10, 1/16, 2/20, and 3/12 and 4/9.  Will travel for groups of 10 or more!  First priority for my limited home/hospital visits is given to those that attend the classes.  Email me to arrange personal consultations.

Thanks for stopping by,

Lindsey Shipley, RN, IBCLC

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photoshoot with mom and lactation consultant

Tuesday Tools – Hand Expression

By | Breastfeeding, Classes, Home/Hospital Visits

Recently, someone on instagram commented, “Help!  I went to go pump and nothing comes out! But if I squeeze the breast around the nipple, milk is there.  Why won’t the pump draw it out?”

These days, it seems like the only two options presented to Moms are breastfeed or pump.  The pump is a great tool in certain instances.  However, it only applies suction!  It’s missing the positive pressure component of the baby’s jaw moving up and down when latched.  That’s why it’s so important to incorporate hands.  Many women who don’t respond well to the pump alone do much better when they start using hand expression.  I believe all breastfeeding Moms need to know this skill – that’s why I teach it in all my classes and consultations .  It can be done alone or in a technique called ‘hands-on pumping’ (full video tutorial in my Pumping and Storing Breastmilk class).  Here is a short clip of how to perform hand expression, either alone or with a helper.  Remember, PUSH+PRESS+RELAX.  PUSH against your chest wall, PRESS your fingers together, and RELAX your hand.

I hope this helps!  More great tips and video tutorials in my video classes.  I also have in-person consults and e-consults available to help prepare and support you in your goals, whatever they may be.  I also have some in-person classes coming up in Highland, UT.  If you’d like me to come to your area, email me!  Make sure you are signed up for my newsletter for more tips and exclusive promos from me and my clients’ favorite products.

Thanks for coming by today,

Lindsey Shipley, RN, IBCLC

Lindsey head shot white jacket