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5 ways partners can support breastfeeding

By | Breastfeeding, Breastfeeding support, breastfeeding tips, community breastfeeding support, Lactation Link team, motherhood

 

Read the top 5 way partners can support a breastfeeding mother from a mom of 3 and lactation educator. Start with a breastfeeding class…

5 ways partners can support breastfeeding

  1. Take a breastfeeding class together. The more you know, the more you can help! You can watch our video classes anytime.  Partners love our classes because they are so convenient and can be watched in the comfort of your own home.  dsc_1535
  2. Take on extra responsibilities.  Mom and baby will be spending lots of time breastfeeding.  Now plan for it. What gives her the most stress? Dishes? Cooking? Laundry? Plan to do more to help out and get creative with additional sources of help.  Consider a bi-monthly housekeeper for a few months.  Consider a meal delivery service.  Think about a diaper delivery service. 
  3. Be a cheerleader. When she is second-guessing herself and her abilities, encourage her. Help her find more resources if needed. We can help with online and in-person consultations.
  4. Baby care. Diapers/burping/babywearing/swaddling are all great things for partners to do! When baby is done feeding, you can help baby burp by holding him/her chest to chest and applying some firm upward pressure with your fingers. You can also be a diaper changing superhero! Babies thrive when being held. When baby doesn’t want to be put down and mom needs a shower, you can wear the baby in a carrier. When my baby was ready for sleep, my husband became the champion swaddler.dsc_1870dsc_1815
    {Ergobaby adapt carrier}

    {Ergobaby Adapt Carrier}

  5. Be there, whenever you can. Many Moms find it supportive when their partner will bring the baby from the bassinet to the mom each time baby wakes to feed during the night. Others really enjoy when their partner can give them a break as needed by babywearing or rocking baby.

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We couldn’t do what we do as moms if it weren’t for great support from our partners! I like to remind partners that the more they are a part of preparation and plans prior to birth, the easier it will be to help after! How did your partner support you? If you are a single mom, how did you find the help and support you needed? Share in the comments.

I’ve created a free e-mail course to help you get breastfeeding started on the right foot! Click the image below for more info.

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Thanks for stopping by,

lindsey-headshot-white-with-grey

Lindsey Shipley, RN, IBCLC

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mom magazine cover

Tuesday Tools with Pregnancy + Newborn Magazine

By | Breastfeeding, Classes, Media

I’m excited to be featured in Pregnancy & Newborn Magazine’s January issue!  I’m debunking a few breastfeeding myths in the article.  Here is a preview of the questions I’m answering:

“Breastfeeding hurts. You’ll just have to get through it.”

“You’ll figure it out as you go.  There’s no need for a prenatal breastfeeding class.”

“Just ask a nurse or lactation specialist at the hospital.”

“At least you tried — just give the baby a bottle.”

“Your mom and sister didn’t produce enough milk, so you probably won’t either.”

Catch my answers and the full article here!  Also, my video breastfeeding classes answer all of these topics in detail!  Available to click and learn and they never expire.  Come say hi on instagram today and make sure you have my ‘Top Ten Tips for Breastfeeding Success’ to start with.

Thanks for coming by,

Lindsey Headshot white with grey

Lindsey Shipley, RN, IBCLC

mother and child

Tuesday Tools – How to stop biting

By | Breastfeeding, Classes, Home/Hospital Visits, Recommended Products

I’ve had a lot of Moms contact me recently about tips to prevent their infant from biting while breastfeeding.  This can really be an issue as infants get a little older and start to cut teeth.  I talk about this more in my Intermediate Breastfeeding video class.

Easing the discomfort of teething

Wearing a silicone teething necklace.  I like these Chewable Charm necklaces because they are safe for baby and also look cute for daily wear!

baby chewing on teething necklace

Offering cold finger foods (frozen peas, blueberries) or also freezing breastmilk in an ice cube tray and offering it to baby in a mesh feeder.

What to do when baby is biting

Many infants will bite towards the end of a feed when they become bored and want to play.  If you start observing closely, you should be able to recognize this playful behavior coming on and stop the feed before biting occurs.  You can do this by breaking suction and turning baby’s attention to a book or toy.  Make sure baby has gotten what he needs from the breast and don’t be alarmed if your infant wants to ‘snack’ more during the teething period.  By ‘snacking’ I mean shorter, more frequent feedings.  If biting ends up happening, you want to break suction and tell your baby “No, no, no,” repeated 3 times.  Be cautious not to yell or startle your baby as this could cause a nursing strike (breast refusal for 2-7 days).  Baby can come back to breast after this, but if biting continues, break suction, say “No, no, no,” 3 times and set baby down somewhere safe and walk away for a minute or two.  When you return, talk to your baby, letting him/her know that biting hurts, and mommy can’t feed when they bite.  It may seem silly, but with consistency this should do the trick!

baby sucking on his mom's breast

I hope this helps!  My Intermediate Breastfeeding class is a great follow-up to Breastfeeding Basics because it addresses so many common issues like sore/cracked nipples, mastitis, thrush, jaundice, tongue-tie, over supply, slow weight gain, boosting milk supply, how to introduce solids, and much more!  Great information you don’t want to miss out on.  I also offer home/hospital consultations (first priority to those who have taken my classes) as well as e-consults for my clients via secure video chat.  Email me to arrange.  Come say hi on instagram today!  Don’t forget about our current promo code for 25% off your entire Loyal Hana clothing purchase.  Check out the previous post for the code and details.  The photography in this post is by Janae Kristen photography.

Thanks for coming by today,

Lindsey Shipley, RN, IBCLC

Lindsey head shot

 

 

 

 

 

 

Friday Favs – Loyal Hana

By | Breastfeeding, Classes, Recommended Products

Recently some of my clients introduced me to the brand Loyal Hana.  Today they are offering 25% off to my readers with the PROMO CODE ‘LLINK’.  It’s a collection of stylish, comfortable and functional clothes for the expectant or nursing mother.  Stylish clothes while breastfeeding?  Yep, it’s true.  Shelley, the owner and designer behind the Loyal Hana line has a vision that you don’t have to sacrifice style while pregnant or breastfeeding.  Kudos to her for providing breastfeeding mamas lots of options – from tees to sweaters to dresses and jumpsuits.  My favorite part?  All her items come equipped with built-in zippers on each side of the chest for easy access to breastfeeding.  You can go from play time to breastfeeding easily and comfortably, without completely disrobing!  Let me show you what I mean.

two moms and their children

Here are a few of my clients wearing Loyal Hana tops at a recent play date with their little ones.

mom reading a book to her child

Notice the discreet built-in zipper on the ‘Alex’ sweater in grey (Upper left shoulder).

baby breastfeeding with a breastfeeding sweater

Jenica is using the side-lying position to breastfeed her sweet baby girl, and the ‘Alex’ sweater maintains a lot of coverage throughout.  No untucking/re-tucking undershirts or stretching out your top by pulling it up or down for breastfeeding access.

baby reading a book with its mom

Jessica and Lily easily go from playtime to feeding session with the Audrey top.

baby breastfeeding with breastfeeding sweater

Jessica is using the cross-cradle position here (nursing pillow is Ergobaby).

lactation consultant with two moms

 

Hope you enjoyed this post and take a minute to checkout Loyal Hana’s line and don’t forget to use promo code ‘LLINK’ for 25% off your total purchase.  Learn about more breastfeeding positions in my video breastfeeding classes and in-person breastfeeding classes.  Come say hi on instagram today. Photography in this post by Janae Kristen photography.

Thanks for coming by today,

Lindsey Shipley, RN, IBCLC

Lindsey Shipley with black jacket

mom learning how to breastfeed correctly

Tuesday Tools – Both Hands Make a “C”

By | Breastfeeding, Classes, Features, Recommended Products

In my Breastfeeding Basics class (offered in-person and online) I spend about ten minutes going over latch.  I focus so much teaching here because I find that the majority of my personal consultations are spent improving or correcting a poor latch.  Difficulty with latch is also one of the top 3 reasons mothers wean their infants.

Today for my Tuesday Tools I’m sharing “Both Hands Make a C” when learning the cross-cradle breastfeeding position (one of my favorites to teach).

women in a class

Here I am in a recent Breastfeeding Basics class teaching the attendees about making a C with their hands when latching their infants.  (Nursing Pillow is from Ergobaby).

baby being breastfed

Here you can see one hand is ‘making a C’ supporting the breast.  Keep in mind not to get too close to the nipple or areola.  You don’t want to get in baby’s way!  You can see the other hand is ‘making a C’ by supporting baby’s neck and her fingers are placed loosely below the infant’s ears.  The palm is resting in-between the shoulder blades.

Hope this helps!  More great tips like this in my breastfeeding video classes – Breastfeeding Basics, Intermediate Breastfeeding, and Pumping and Storing Breastmilk.  Once you purchase the classes they can viewed over and over and they never expire!  In-person class dates coming up are 12/10, 1/16, 2/20, 3/12, and 4/9.  If you’d like me to come to your area, I would love to travel for a class size of 5-10. Email me to arrange.

Thanks for coming by,

Lindsey Shipley, RN, IBCLC

Lindsey head shot

Baby breastfeeding with pillow

Ergobaby + Lactation Link

By | Breastfeeding, Classes, Recommended Products

I’m excited to be featured as a guest contributor over on Ergobaby’s blog today.  The post is titled, “Happy Mommy, Happy Baby. Top 2 ‘Must-dos’ with Ergobaby”.  Wanted to share a sneak peek with you.

Skin-to-skin & Positioning

In the post today, I’m discussing skin-to-skin contact and positioning.  These are such important parts of building a successful breastfeeding relationship.  The great thing about breastfeeding is it cuts down on the amount of “things” we require to feed or care for our baby.  So when I recommend something, it is typical something I’ve used myself as a Mom and something I know to be very useful for many other breastfeeding Moms.  I used the Ergobaby carrier with my kids and now I use the Ergobaby nursing pillow in my office appts.  My clients love it because it has a unique curve design that acts as a wedge and helps keep baby facing Mom in the tummy-to-tummy position.

Lactation consultant helping mom breastfeed baby

Baby breastfeeding with pillow

Mom with baby

Office essentials for my clients

Here is a little look at a few essentials I keep stocked in my cabinet for office consultations.  The Ergo Baby nursing pillow, Undercover Mama nursing tanks, and the ‘Supermom’ nursing bra from Simple Wishes to name a few!  I have discount codes on these items in my Favorites section.

Baby cabinet

I hope you guys enjoy the full post over on Ergobaby.  Let me know what you think today on instagram and enter to win a baby carrier and nursing pillow from Ergobaby!  My video breastfeeding classes are available at your convenience.  I have in-person classes coming up in UT on 10/24, 11/5, and 11/14.  I’ve also been invited to teach 2 classes in the Denver area next week — Breastfeeding Basics on 10/21 and Intermediate Breastfeeding on 10/22.  Space is limited, must be registered to secure your spot!  I’d love to meet you in class.

I’ve created this great e-mail course to help you get breastfeeding started on the right foot! Click the image below for more info.

6-day

Thanks for coming by today,

xo ~ Lindsey, RN, IBCLC

Lindsey Shipley - Lactation Consultant

 

How to relieve breast pain while breastfeeding via lactationlink.com

“I keep getting plugged ducts! Help!”

By | Breastfeeding, Breastfeeding support, breastfeeding tips

I’ve had a lot of questions on Instagram about plugged ducts, causes and management. I address this topic in detail in my Breastfeeding Hurdles and How-to’s class. I’m going to answer a few of your questions on the topic directly today!

best tips for plugged ducts via lactationlink.com“How do I know if I have a plugged duct or mastitis?”

Mastitis means inflammation of the breast tissue, and comes in different forms, including plugged ducts. A plugged duct means that a milk duct is not draining properly and milk is getting stopped up in that area. If a plugged duct is managed improperly, it can lead to an infection of the breast tissue.

Here are some signs that you have a plugged duct (1):

  • tender spot
  • redness
  • sore lump
  • no fever
  • comes on gradually
  • may shift in location
  • little or no warmth to the touch
  • feel generally well

“I keep getting plugged ducts! What do I do?”

best tips for plugged ducts via lactationlink.comLike I mentioned, it’s important to manage plugged ducts properly, so you don’t develop a breast tissue infection.

Here are some ways to treat and alleviate plugged ducts (2):

  • ensure a good latch (asymmetrical latch technique)
  • frequent nursing (at least every 2 hours on affected side)
  • alternate breastfeeding positions
  • gentle breast massage in circular motion
  • warm compress 10-20 min before feeding
  • loosen constrictive clothing (bra underwire)
  • Don’t use breast shells
  • Get more rest
  • Decrease stress

Want more great tips like these to get breastfeeding off to a good start? Click the image below!

6-day

Thanks for stopping by,

lindsey-headshot-white-with-grey

Lindsey Shipley, RN, IBCLC

References

  1. Lawrence, R., & Lawrence, R. (1998). Breastfeeding: A Guide for the Medical Profession (5th edition). St. Louis, MO: Mosby.
  1. Mohrbacher, N., & Stock, J. (2003). La Leche League International The Breastfeeding Answer Book (3rd edition). Schaumburg, IL: La Leche League International.

 

Volume of breastmilk needed when bottle feeding. via lactationlink.com, a lactation consultant's blog.

Volume of breastmilk when bottle-feeding

By | Breastfeeding, Breastfeeding support, breastfeeding tips

I held a Q&A last week on Instagram, and many Moms asked me about how much breastmilk to feed their baby when bottle-feeding. This is a valid concern because many of us will be separated from our infants at some point due to returning to work, travel, or a night out. When we are breastfeeding, we can’t see the volume the infant is receiving. This is why many women constantly worry about their supply. Some great indicators that your supply is just fine are wet/messy diapers, baby is content between feeds, appropriate weight gain, etc.

volume of breastmilk needed when bottlefeeding via lactationlink.comIt is impossible for anyone to say how much milk an infant will want at any given feeding. A small baby will consume anywhere from 2-4 ounces, 8-12 times, in a 24 hour period (1). Another good rule of thumb early on is an ounce per month old the infant is. From there, the caregiver will start to gauge how much the infant needs at a feeding. Chances are, an older breastfed infant won’t consume 8-9 ounces during a feed like their formula-fed counterparts. Why? Because the energy components of breastmilk are utilized more efficiently than formula, so less is required. Keep in mind, even breastfed babies will consume more volume when breastmilk is offered in a bottle rather than the breast. This is due to the faster flow rate of a bottle.

volume of breastmilk needed for bottlefeeding via lactationlink.comTips to use when offering a breastfed baby a bottle to avoid overfeeding:

  • Using the slowest flow nipple available
  • Holding the baby in a more upright position to let gravity slow the flow
  • “Pacing the feed”, taking short breaks to allow the infant to realize when they’re satisfied

Also, remember that the baby is the most efficient remover of milk so when you are reunited, allow your infant to feed often to ensure the maintenance of a good milk supply! I hope this helps all of you that were asking.

I have a great giveaway going on right now for a Solly Baby wrap, ends tonight at midnight so hurry and enter on my instagram page @lactationlink!

Want some great education and support to get breastfeeding off to a great start? Click the image below!

6-day

Thanks for stopping by,

lindsey-headshot-white-with-grey

Lindsey Shipley, RN, IBCLC

 

References

1. Mohrbacher, N., & Stock, J. (2003). La Leche League International The Breastfeeding Answer Book (3rd edition). Schaumburg, IL: La Leche League International.