Category

breastfeeding tips

Best Nursing Bras and Nursing Tanks: 3 Nursing Must-Haves

By | Breastfeeding, Breastfeeding support, breastfeeding tips, Features, Recommended Products

Every day on Instagram, I get questions like:
“What’s the best nursing bra?”
“Where can I find nursing tanks?”
“I’m looking for a cute nursing bra!”
Today I want to answer your questions and help you get started with 3 basic nursing pieces (Lactation Link tested and approved!) from Bravado Designs that every nursing mama could use – and use lots!! Read through to get an exclusive promo code from Bravado Designs.

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Tips for labor & delivery to make breastfeeding easier via lactationlink.com

3 Tips for labor & delivery to make breastfeeding easier

By | Breastfeeding, Breastfeeding support, breastfeeding tips

We know that prenatal breastfeeding education is a big factor in breastfeeding success (1). We are thrilled to help moms get the information they need prior to birth to have a successful breastfeeding experience. In addition to prenatal education, there are a few ways to help breastfeeding get off to a good start. Labor and delivery is one place to look.

When all the focus is on helping mom and baby have a safe delivery, we might forget about a few things during labor and delivery that can help make breastfeeding easier. Here are a few things about labor and delivery that not only help you have a more enjoyable experience, they can also help get breastfeeding started well. Be sure to discuss any of these options with your healthcare provider and place of birth.

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Can I exercise and breastfeed? via lactationlink.com

Can I breastfeed if I want to exercise?

By | Breastfeeding, Breastfeeding support, breastfeeding tips, Can I breastfeed if?, motherhood

After healing and resting from pregnancy and childbirth, many moms feel the need to bring some more movement into their routine. Often moms are concerned about how exercise and breastfeeding can go together. Luckily, studies have shown that moderate exercise will not affect your milk supply (1). So why do so many moms worry about exercise and breastfeeding? Lots of new moms begin exercising around 6 weeks postpartum and at the same time, baby often starts nursing more frequently. Many moms think this means they are having issues with supply, related to their exercise. But actually, 6 weeks is a normal growth spurt when baby will need to nurse more often. So feel free to start moving your body in healthy ways without any worries about supply. If you do have consistent worries about supply, please contact a lactation consultant. We have 4 lactation consultants here at Lactation Link that can help online or in-person.

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3 of the best things you can do during pregnancy to prepare for motherhood via lactationlink.com

3 of the best things you can do during pregnancy

By | Breastfeeding, Breastfeeding support, breastfeeding tips, motherhood

There are some things I wish I would have known as a first-time mom. From my thorough Pinterest research (snicker) I assumed that the best thing I could do for my baby was to create a beautiful nursery and buy a bunch of stuff. Spoiler alert: we didn’t use the nursery or much of the stuff. Baby slept in a pack n’ play next to our bed for most of his first year. Creating a cute nautical-themed nursery was fun, but unnecessary.

What I wish I would have done was prepare to learn how to breastfeed. I thought I would just figure it out at the hospital. The nurses were great and encouraged me but had other patients to help too. So I went home not quite knowing what to do. I devoured every book on breastfeeding at my local library and went to several lactation appointments and we eventually hit our stride. We had a wonderful breastfeeding experience for over 13 months which led to even better experiences with my second and third children. But learning how to breastfeed didn’t have to happen when I was sleep deprived and anxious about my newborn. If I would have had access to a breastfeeding class like our Breastfeeding Basics class, I know breastfeeding would have come much easier.

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How to wean via lactationlink.com

How to Wean from Breastfeeding

By | Breastfeeding, Breastfeeding support, breastfeeding tips, motherhood

Many of you have been requesting a post on how to wean. No matter how much we and our babies enjoy nursing, it will come to an end at some point! It’s up to you and your child to decide when is best. Today I wanted to share a bit more on how to wean by first discussing Child-Led Weaning and Mother-Led Weaning. I hope this post will give you some confidence in this process! As always, know your options so you can continue to create confidence in your choices as a mom!

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Common Breastfeeding Concerns and Solutions via lactationlink.com/blog || Creating Confident Moms

Common Breastfeeding Concerns

By | Breastfeeding, Breastfeeding support, breastfeeding tips

Hello, mamas! I’m Stephanie Weight Hadfield, BS, IBCLC. I’m a mom of 4 and a lactation consultant with Lactation Link. Today I’m talking about some of the most common breastfeeding concerns I see when I’m consulting with moms and babies.

Pain and Nipple Tenderness
Milk Supply
Medications While Breastfeeding
Concerns with breastfeeding older babies
Nursing Strikes

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Nipple care guide via lactationlink.com

Nipple Care Guide

By | Breastfeeding, Breastfeeding support, breastfeeding tips

Hi mamas, I’m Stephanie Weight Hadfield, an International Board Certified Lactation Consultant (IBCLC) and mom of 4. I’m here today to share a guide to caring for your nipples before and during breastfeeding. This nipple care guide will help prepare you for breastfeeding with confidence!

At Lactation Link, we get lots of questions from mamas wondering if they need to do anything special during pregnancy to prep their nipples for breastfeeding, or if nipples need special care or cleaning once baby is here. The quick answer is no. The nipple and areola (pronounced air-e-O-la, it’s the darker pigmented area that surrounds your nipple) can do a pretty good job taking care of themselves.Because of this, our nipples do not need any special nipple care during pregnancy. You don’t need to do anything to disinfect your nipples and you definitely don’t need to “toughen them up”.

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Breastfeeding baby hunger cues via lactationlink.com

Breastfeeding baby hunger cues

By | Breastfeeding, Breastfeeding support, breastfeeding tips

Soon after you’re holding your fresh bundle of joy the reality can set in: you are responsible for keeping this little one alive and thriving!  So how do you know when your baby is hungry if he can’t tell you?  Well, baby not be able to use words and tell you, but he sure can let you know when he’s ready to eat! Read on to learn about newborn hunger cues!

Babies have great survival instincts and consistent behaviors to show when they are hungry (and then when they’re full!).  Sometimes it can take some time to learn your baby’s cues to eat, but it’s important to remember that nursing is about more than just the food. You can offer the breast to your baby even if it hasn’t been the standard 2-3 hours that the hospital said would be in between feeds.  You can’t nurse too much!  

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Why breastfeeding reduces the risk of SIDS via lactationlink.com

What is SIDS and how can breastfeeding reduce my baby’s risk?

By | Breastfeeding, Breastfeeding support, breastfeeding tips

Hi mamas, I’m Stephanie Weight Hadfield, an International Board Certified Lactation Consultant (IBCLC) and mom of 4. I’m here today to talk about SIDS and how breastfeeding can reduce your baby’s risk. I hope it brings you more confidence as you face infant feeding and sleeping options!

SIDS, or Sudden Infant Death Syndrome, is a worry that strikes fear into the hearts of just about every parent. According to the CDC, SIDS is the sudden death of an infant less than 1 year of age that cannot be explained after a thorough investigation. In 2015, SIDS was given as the cause of death for about 1,600 U.S. babies (1). Although SIDS is different from smothering or suffocation, they are all often lumped together in the research and discussion, which can make it difficult to really understand what is going on.

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