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3 Breastfeeding Myths

Let’s bust these myths…

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Small breast do not equal small amounts of milk. Milk supply isn’t just the size of your breast. Your milk supply is determined by effective draining and amount of feedings daily. Size isn’t the main factor your milk volume is determined by supply and demand. Effective latching and frequent feedings will be best for a large supply. 

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Flat/Inverted nipples do not mean you can’t breastfeed. It means you may need to get creative with positioning, hand placement and stimulating your nipples when latching. If you have flat or inverted nipples book a prenatal appointment with an IBCLC. This will help you prepare, know what to expect and how to navigate latching issues if they arise.

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Leaking is NOT an indicator of supply. Leaking is completely individualized. It has to do with the physical structures in your breast like the ligament and muscles. Often we think of leaking as overflowing. With breast leaking or milk letting down is based on release of oxytocin, nipple stimulation and the physical structures. Some moms it may be a crying baby that causes leaking. Some moms may leak when very relaxed. Some moms may not leak at all until baby is born. All of these scenarios are normal and none of them indicate a large or small milk supply.

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Milk being fatty enough is NOT. A. THING. All breastmilk has calories and fat. If your baby is struggling with weight gain and someone suggest it’s due to the “lack of fat” in your milk. They DO NOT know milk science. There isn’t good milk or bad milk. Breastmilk is biologically made to be quick effective nutrient dense food for our babies. If baby isn’t gaining weight it’s probably more of a milk transfer issue. Meaning the milk is there but your baby may have issues draining the milk from your breast. If you are struggling book a consult with an IBCLC who can evaluate a feeding instead.

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Have you heard of these myths? What other common things were you told about breastfeeding? Comment below! 

Thanks for stopping by,

Aubri Lutz, RN, IBCLC